Friday Links Round-Up: Your Weekly Pest Control Articles

Sideview of black widow spiderFriday Links Round-Up: Your Weekly Pest Control Articles

 

Rodents Don’t Like Cold Weather Either

Now that summer is on the way out and winter is fast approaching, it is once again time to fortify your home against the coming invasion of mice, rodents, and bats. More…

The American Cockroach: What You Need To Know

Those who have the misfortune of dealing with roaches are left with more questions than answers. What do American cockroaches look like? What do they eat? Why are they attracted to my home? How can I get rid of them and prevent them from returning? Get answers to those questions and more, by clicking here.

4 Easy Ways To Know If You’ve Been Bitten By Bed Bugs

Uh, Oh! You wake up in the morning with a handful of red marks across your abdomen. How do you know if these are bedbug bites? More…

Fall Spider Barrier Treatments

For various reasons, a variety of spiders begin turning up in homes and offices in increasing numbers during the fall. For the most part, it’s the same reason that you go inside: to stay out of the cold. Learn more about how to stop this behavior, so you can enjoy your home, by clicking here.

Landscaping Tip: Garter Snake Pest Control

Garter snakes are the most commonly found garden snake that homeowners and landscapers encounter. What can you do about them? More…

 

Africanized Honeybee ScoutPest Of The Week: Africanized “Killer” Bees

What most people refer to as “killer bees,” are technically called Africanized Honeybees. These aggressive bees are hybrids of the African honeybee and the European honeybee, and were unintentionally bred through scientific research at the University of São Paulo in the late 1950’s. Then the worst happened… a few got loose in the Brazilian tropics, and have been migrating north ever since.

One of the scariest features of the Africanized “killer” bee is their aggressive behavior. Additionally, you cannot visually tell the difference between the killer bee and the common European honey bee. They look the same, and spend their time pollinating flowers, crops, and producing honey. In fact, the only way to tell the difference between these bees, other than their aggressive swarming behavior, is through molecular analysis.

The Africanized honeybee is extremely hostile. This behavior is what gives these bees their infamous “killer” reputation. Unlike standard honeybees, Africanized killer bees are effortlessly agitated and aggressive when disturbed. They will chase everything they estimate to be hazardous to their colony, and can continue to be agitated for up to 24 hours. This behavior leads to many Africanized killer bee attacks every year in the United States; some of which have even lead to death in both humans and animals.

Friday Links To Pest Control News

Black Light ScorpionFriday Links To Pest Control News

Black Lighting Scorpions For Scorpion Control

Are you the adventurous type, always looking for something to do at night? Try something new… Try black-lighting scorpions. It’s a fun nighttime activity that can also help keep your home and property free from stinging scorpions. More…

Avoiding Mosquito Problems in the Summer Months

For some tips on how to keep mosquitoes from breeding, and how to keep these blood-sucking pests from biting you, click here.

Austin Bats In Danger?

Every year some 100,000 plus people visit Austin’s Congress Avenue Bridge to witness one of nature’s marvels. During summer evenings, upwards of 1.5 million bats emerge from the crevices of the bridge. It’s a magnificent sight; a sight that many are worried may be no more now that White-Nose Syndrome has hit the state of Texas. More…

Squirrel Damage

While observing squirrels on your property, be weary. These pests can cause some serious damage. More…

5 Tips To Control Colorado House Spiders

House spiders are some of the biggest and ugliest home invaders out there; and apparently they are a big problem in Colorado. Here are a few tips on keeping House spiders out of your home. More…

Western Honey BeePest Of The Week: The Western Honey Bee

Our pest of the week this week really isn’t much of a pest at all; but is considered quite beneficial to our ecosystem. I’m of course referring to the Western Honey Bee. These bees are sometimes referred to as European Honey Bees, because they were introduced from Europe. Most of us just call them honey bees because they create sweet honey—a multi-billion dollar industry here in the United States. Honey bees make their honey when they regurgitate nectar, adding an enzyme. In addition to making honey, Western Honey bees also pollinate flowering plants.

Generally speaking, Western Honey bees measure ½ inch to ¾ inch in length. They have banded abdomens, covered in a very fine hair, and are a combination of yellow and black. A single colony of Western Honey bees can reach numbers of 100,000 members; gathering in a hive. Each hive consists of a caste system with the queen, drones, and workers. The queen lays the eggs, the drones mate with the queen, and the worker bees feed the colony. It’s these worker bees that most of us encounter as they’re gathering pollen. These encounters can sometimes result in painful stings, leading some people to believe the Western Honey bee to be a pest.