Why do some things glow under a UV/black light?

What do scorpions and teeth have in common? They both glow under a UV/black light! If you think about it, we see these types of lights quite often, in amusement parks, Halloween, bowling alleys, and even pest control. The real question is why do some things glow under UV/black lights, while others don’t?

 

A black light is actually a type of UV light, there are many types of UV or Ultraviolet lights, but the one in a black light is specifically UV-A. Ultraviolet light is a type of light with a less than normal wavelength, meaning it is out of the the visibility spectrum. UV lights are the the same type of light that emits from the sun. When these UV lights hit and reflect off of certain things, interesting reactions will happen. For example, when UV rays from the sun hit your skin you could get sunburned. In the case of a black light, when the UV light hits the chemical element phosphorus, it reacts by glowing. “Coincidentally”, phosphorus is common in plasma screen televisions, certain fabrics, teeth, fingernails, and scorpions! So if you’re ever at a bowling alley and your shirt, teeth, and fingernails start to glow, the answer is phosphorus!

Friday Links To Pest Control News

Black Light ScorpionFriday Links To Pest Control News

Black Lighting Scorpions For Scorpion Control

Are you the adventurous type, always looking for something to do at night? Try something new… Try black-lighting scorpions. It’s a fun nighttime activity that can also help keep your home and property free from stinging scorpions. More…

Avoiding Mosquito Problems in the Summer Months

For some tips on how to keep mosquitoes from breeding, and how to keep these blood-sucking pests from biting you, click here.

Austin Bats In Danger?

Every year some 100,000 plus people visit Austin’s Congress Avenue Bridge to witness one of nature’s marvels. During summer evenings, upwards of 1.5 million bats emerge from the crevices of the bridge. It’s a magnificent sight; a sight that many are worried may be no more now that White-Nose Syndrome has hit the state of Texas. More…

Squirrel Damage

While observing squirrels on your property, be weary. These pests can cause some serious damage. More…

5 Tips To Control Colorado House Spiders

House spiders are some of the biggest and ugliest home invaders out there; and apparently they are a big problem in Colorado. Here are a few tips on keeping House spiders out of your home. More…

Western Honey BeePest Of The Week: The Western Honey Bee

Our pest of the week this week really isn’t much of a pest at all; but is considered quite beneficial to our ecosystem. I’m of course referring to the Western Honey Bee. These bees are sometimes referred to as European Honey Bees, because they were introduced from Europe. Most of us just call them honey bees because they create sweet honey—a multi-billion dollar industry here in the United States. Honey bees make their honey when they regurgitate nectar, adding an enzyme. In addition to making honey, Western Honey bees also pollinate flowering plants.

Generally speaking, Western Honey bees measure ½ inch to ¾ inch in length. They have banded abdomens, covered in a very fine hair, and are a combination of yellow and black. A single colony of Western Honey bees can reach numbers of 100,000 members; gathering in a hive. Each hive consists of a caste system with the queen, drones, and workers. The queen lays the eggs, the drones mate with the queen, and the worker bees feed the colony. It’s these worker bees that most of us encounter as they’re gathering pollen. These encounters can sometimes result in painful stings, leading some people to believe the Western Honey bee to be a pest.