Mosquito Guide 2016- What You Need To Know

mosquitosWith the mosquito populations worse than they have ever been, and the recent media firestorm surrounding the Zika virus, 2016 is proving to be the year of the mosquito. In fact, Bulwark Exterminating is being flooded with daily calls from people looking for relief from these pesky, blood-sucking pests.

The truth is that these pests are a major concern due to the diseases they transmit how they can negatively affect an economy by preventing outdoor recreation and production due to their significant annoyance.

The good news is that mosquitoes can be successfully managed through diligent efforts from both property owners and pest management professionals.

Here’s what you need to know about these annoying yet dangerous pests; your 2016 mosquito guide:

Understanding The Mosquito Basics

Arm_MosquitoBoth male and female adult mosquitoes feed on the nectar from plants to obtain nutrients to survive. Female mosquitoes also require the protein found in the blood of animals to support the production of eggs. Male mosquitoes do not require blood meals and therefor do not bite. Between the many species of mosquitoes, females can feed on human and animal blood both day and night.

Mosquito eggs must be laid in standing water to develop, and the eggs typically tend to hatch in just 1 to 3 days. Any object that is capable of retaining water for seven or more days is a potential production site for mosquitoes. This may include cans, rain barrels, and old tires. Under optimum conditions, a female mosquito can produce 50-500 eggs in her first brood.

Diseases Transmitted By Mosquitoes

It is said that mosquitoes pose a greater threat to human health and existence than any other animal worldwide. Malaria and Yellow Fever account for about 1,060,000 deaths per year worldwide. Although these diseases rarely occur in the US, these numbers are rising and outbreaks are expanding.

Some diseases that occur in the US as a result of mosquito bites include:

  • West Nile Virus – Few cases have caused fatal neurological disease in humans.
  • Zika Fever – A disease that can cause birth defects in pregnant women.
  • Dengue – An illness caused by a virus that is spread through mosquito bites. Causes flu like symptoms and in rare cases leads to death.

What’s All This About Zika?

Virus_Spreads_NewspaperZika virus has gained an increasing foothold across the Americas and Pacific islands. The virus, which is transmitted mainly via mosquitoes, is part of a group of viruses closely related to other mosquito-borne infections, including dengue, West Nile, and yellow fever. They’re geographically in similar areas, and they also have many of the same symptoms.

Once infected with Zika, only about 20% of people ever show symptoms of the virus, which most commonly include fever, rash, joint pain, and red eyes.

There is no vaccine or treatment available for the virus. One reason Zika is troubling is because it is a cause of birth defects including microcephaly (a condition where the baby’s head is abnormally small) in babies whose mothers have had Zika. The virus also been linked to a neurological condition called Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

Successful Mosquito Reduction: Inspection

Finding the areas where mosquitoes lay eggs is the crucial first step in controlling mosquitoes. Without treating or eliminating the source, mosquitoes will continue to be an ongoing battle.

Key inspection sites include:

  • Ornamental ponds and natural bodies of water
  • Green pools
  • Containers/flower pots and discarded items that may be holding water
  • Rain gutters and crawl spaces
  • Old car tires
  • Landscaping and irrigation systems
  • Bird baths/fountains
  • Holes in trees
  • Buckets/tub
  • Wheel barrels

Essentially, any location capable of holding standing water for seven or more days is a potential production site for mosquitoes. Unneeded water receptacles should be emptied and discarded if possible.

Successful Mosquito Reduction: Treatment

A two method approach consisting of larvacide mosquito dunks combined with a standard barrier treatment is required to significantly reduce the mosquito population on your property.

A close up shot of the common pest mosquito, Aedes vexans, resting on the water it just emerged from.  Below the water surface are several pupae waiting to emerge.

Larvicide Mosquito Dunks

Larvacide mosquito dunks are an insecticide which is specifically targeted for the larval life stage of an insect. A tablet is introduced into the stagnant water where mosquito larvae are found. These mosquito dunks treat the ponds and/or other standing water sources, preventing mosquito larvae from growing into breeding, biting, adults.

Barrier Treatment

Thick vegetation around a home can provide excellent resting sites for many mosquito species. Mosquitoes roost on the underside of leaves. Mosquito fogging is very effective method of leaving a residual product on the underside of leaves. By fogging the undersides of bushes and trees with a specialized pest control fogger with a combination of specific mosquito control product leaves a lasting residual where adult mosquitoes roost.  Additionally, these products will also be picked up by the adults and transferred to water sites when eggs are laid. This will kill off adult mosquitoes and help halt the local population’s reproduction cycle.

Permanent Mosquito Control

Mosquito_SwarmThe unfortunate truth is that mosquitoes can travel up to five miles looking for a blood meal. While taking the above treatment methods will drastically decrease the number of mosquitoes you’ll see in your home and on your property, a neighborhood effort must be made to rid yourself of them completely. Work with your neighbors to eliminate standing water on their property. Things like un-kept pools can be brought to the attention of local community agencies and HOA’s so they may be addressed.

Through diligent efforts from both property owners and pest management professionals, mosquitoes can be successfully managed.

Concerns Over Aerial Spraying For Mosquitoes

Much of the United States has been under attack by mosquitoes, and experts believe the mosquito problem is going to get worse. These mosquito attacks have many people worried because of the possibility of a West Nile Virus infection. CNN reports, this year’s West Nile Virus outbreak is the largest the United States has ever seen since the disease was first discovered in 1999. The state of Texas has been hit the hardest these last couple years, as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention state that almost 80 percent of the nation’s reported West Nile cases are from the Lonestar state.

Aerial spraying for mosquitoes is a common and effective way to combat mosquitoes and the spread of West Nile Virus. Dropping pesticides from the sky raises many concerns and questions, including possible reaction to DUET.

DUET Reactions

West_Nile_Virus_SignThe pesticide that is being drop sprayed to combat the mosquito population is called DUET. The most common reaction upon DUET exposure is a prickling or burning sensation on your skin. Other reactions can consist of a tearing in your eyes or blurred vision, and respiratory irritation if you inhale it.

Who’s Most at Risk?

It’s hard to predict what kind of reactions, if any, people will have to the pesticides, but people that already have allergies, lung disease, lung cancer, asthma, and other respiratory infections are more at risk. Pregnant women also need to take added precautions. Although it’s not time to panic, health professionals are urging the public to take certain precautions throughout this process.

Aerial Spraying Precautions

  • Stay inside until it settles—usually a couple of hours
  • Bring pets inside
  • If your real sensitive to chemicals, leave town
  • Don’t wear the shoes you wear outside, inside your home for a few days
  • Wash vehicles, toys, patio furniture, pet bowls, fruits, and vegetables.

Pest Control Console

If you are concerned about the DUET pesticide, the West Nile Virus, or mosquitoes on your property, contact a pest control professional today for more information.

Labor Day Week Pest Control Links Round-Up

Labor Day Week Pest Control Links Round-Up

 

wasp stingingWasp Ruins My Labor Day

While enjoying my outdoor Labor Day picnic, I feel this small quiver underneath my blouse. I brush at it, thinking nothing of it at first, when I realize that ‘quiver’ inside my blouse has legs… and a bad temper! More…

Take the Bite Out of Labor Day

Nothing puts a damper on end-of-summer picnics and camp-outs faster than biting bugs. Unfortunately, mosquitoes and other insect pests come with the summertime territory. You can keep pesky – and sometimes dangerous – bugs from ruining your time outdoors over the long Labor Day weekend by taking three steps for complete protection. More…

The Beesness of Bees and Wasps

Hopefully the bees and wasps didn’t give you the “beesness” this Labor Day. More…

West Nile Numbers On The Rise, But Is It As Bad As Last Year?

How many of you where at all worried about mosquitoes and West Nile Virus over the weekend? Did you need to be? See how the mosquito and WNV numbers compare to last year’s. More…

Stay On Guard For Mosquitoes Over Labor Day Weekend

Officials are warning us about mosquito activity over the Labor Day weekend. More…

 

Sweat beePest Of The Week: The Sweat Bee

Found throughout most of the world, with the exception of Southeast Asia and Australia, the sweat bee is a beautiful flying pest. This native North American bee are commonly metallic in color; a metallic green, yellow, red, or combination of all three. A few types of sweat bees can be a boring brown or black in color as well.

Many people are scared at the sight of a sweat bee because of their intense appearance. Rest easy folks, as these bees are actually quite docile and will not sting you unless you go out of your way to handle one of them.

These bees happen to get their names from one particular trait… They love sweat! They are drawn to human perspiration; something the sweat bee gets important nutrients from. Sweat bees frequently nest underground, or in dead or rotting wood. Although they are solitary bees, sweat bees have been known to work together and share nests and tunnels.

3 Pests That Can Ruin Your Fourth Of July

Fourth_Of_July_Family

Among all of your festive Fourth of July BBQ’s, fireworks, pool parties, and parades can lurk unanticipated nuisances that may very well wreak havoc on the day’s festivities (and I’m not talking about your Uncle Roger who drinks too much). I’m talking of course about bugs!

Here are three such nuisances, or outdoor pests, that can ruin your Fourth of July holiday:

Yellow Jackets

Wasps_On_Watermelon

One of the most popular Fourth of July activities are family picnics or barbeques. In fact, Last July 4th some 78 million Americans had a barbecue; grilling everything from hotdogs, to hamburgers, to shish kabobs. The sweet watermelon and sticky sodas draw in unwanted pests to your barbeques or picnics… Stinging pests!

Feeding on foods rich in sugars and carbohydrates (fruits, flower nectar, and tree sap), the Yellowjacket wasp also feeds on proteins (insects, meats, fish, etc.). So that means that just about anything you’ll eat on the Fourth of July can draw in yellowjackets. Building their nests in trees, shrubs, or in protected places such as inside human-made structures, yellowjacket nests expand rather rapidly with as many as 5,000 stinging wasp members. The worst thing about these flying pests? All female members of the species are able to sting multiple times, causing incredible pain to anyone who has been stung.

Be on the lookout for their nests before you set out the day’s yummy food. If you do find a nest, keep away, and get a professional wasp removal service.

Fire Ants

Hands In Ant Nest

“The Red Coats are coming!!!”  “The Red Coats are coming!!!”

On April 18, 1775, Paul Revere rode from Boston to Lexington and Concord, screaming “the Red Coats are coming,” warning patriots that the red clad British army was marching. Some 238 years later a different kind of Red Coat is coming; a Red Coat that is malicious and spiteful just like a British soldier.

I’m talking, of course, about the Red Imported Fire ant and if you live anywhere in the Southern United States you are very familiar with their tactics. Their mounds can be huge, and if disturbed, hundreds of these stinging ants can come pouring out looking to violently defend their queen (much like the British Army did back in 1775). These extremely painful stings will cause welts on the skin and in rare cases even cause death. To top it all off, these ants may be on the move this July Fourth, looking for your food.

If you have Fire Ant mounds in or around your home or property, get professional Fire Ant control.

Mosquitoes

Many mosquitos on skin

The most prevalent Fourth of July pest is the blood-sucking mosquito, and they just happen to be the most active during the dawn and dusk hours; the exact times you will be outdoors for parades and fireworks. Female mosquitoes feed on the blood of the living, and can transmit extremely harmful or even deadly diseases like West Nile Virus and Yellow Fever. Some authorities even argue that mosquitoes are the most deadly animals on earth.

Since September 2012, the Center for Disease Control reports some 3,142 cases of the West Nile virus disease in people, including 134 deaths. These numbers continue to grow. Don’t add to them this Independence Day. Make sure you wear mosquito repellant with DEET while you are outside celebrating.

Happy July 4th!

All of us bug guys here at blogpestcontrol.com and Bulwark Exterminating would like to wish you all a happy and safe Independence Day! Spend some time with family and friends, eat way too much potato salad, marvel at the stunning firework shows, and reflect on all of the blessings that are bestowed upon us as we live in the greatest country on Earth! Happy July 4th!

 

Top 5 Best & Worst Mosquito Repellants

Mosquito repellantThursday is the Fourth of July! It’s a time we will gather together with our families and friends; celebrating living in the world’s best country. We will commemorate our nation’s independence by waving flags at parades, cooling off in swimming pools, woofing down tons of hotdogs and potato salad at BBQ’s, and cap the day off by lighting or watching vibrant fireworks.

With all of the day’s festivities, the last thing you want to worry about is blood-sucking pests like mosquitoes and ticks. One of the best ways to keep these irritating bugs from ruining your holiday is to wear a good insect repellant when you are outdoors. With so many bug sprays on the market today, we are all left wondering which ones work the best; and which ones will simply drain our wallets and offer no relieve from flying pests.

Here are the top five best and worst mosquito repellants:

Top 5 Best Mosquito Repellants

Consumer Reports recently released their ranking for the best mosquito repellants on the market today. Factors used to determine the mosquito repellant rankings include: cost per ounce, percentage of active ingredient (DEET) hours of effectiveness, and damage to materials. Here are the rankings:

 

Best Mosquito Repellants
Best Mosquito Repellants

 

Note: Only four of the top five mosquito repellants offered protection for eight hours or more. Non-coincidently, these four repellants also contained the active ingredient DEET in varying levels; the most effective mosquito repellant on the market.

Top 5 Worst Mosquito Repellants

GoodGuide also recently released their mosquito repellant rankings based on health, environment, and society factors. They count the number of ingredients in each product that are categorized as low, medium or high health concern; and then factor in other negative information (such as regulatory restrictions) and any available positive information (such as third-party certifications) to assign product scores. Here are the five worst mosquito products as determined by GoodGuide:

 

Worst Mosquito Repellants
Worst Mosquito Repellants

 

Note: It’s important to note that all of the tested products will keep the mosquitoes from biting if you’re going to be outside for only a short period of time. Look for a highly rated product to protect you on longer excursions.

How Mosquito Repellants Were Tested

For these insect repellent reviews, courageous testers at an outside lab bared their arms in mosquito-filled cages and also let ticks crawl on them. Scientists recorded how long it took for mosquitoes to start biting and for ticks to crawl over treated areas.

Factors used to determine the mosquito repellant rankings include: cost per ounce, percentage of active ingredient (DEET) hours of effectiveness, damage to materials, and the health, environmental, and social performance of products and companies.

Mosquito_Close-up_Sucking_BloodMosquitoes & West Nile Virus

There are currently some 176 different species of mosquitoes living here in the United States; all sharing one common characteristic… They are irritating! One common misconception about mosquitoes is that they all bite and suck blood. The truth is, it’s only the adult female mosquitoes that have a long piercing mouthpart needed to suck blood. She does so in order to provide for her future brood of mosquitoes. Males differ from females by having feathery antennae and mouthparts not suitable for piercing skin. A mosquito’s principal food is nectar or similar sugar source.

One unfortunate characteristic about the mosquito is that they can carry the deadly West Nile Virus. The Center for Disease Control urges the public to take precautions when outdoors. Make sure you wear an insect repellent with DEET; dress in clothing that covers as much skin as possible, and completely avoid the outdoors between dusk and dawn if at all possible.

To stop mosquitoes from breeding on your property, make sure to eliminate any standing water like in puddles, in kiddie pools, in tire swings, and in bird fountains. The easiest way to remove mosquitoes on your property is to kill their larva. Mosquito dunks, or larvicides, are dropped into water killing larva and stopping mosquitoes from laying their eggs. Treatments last for 30 days and cover 100 square feet regardless of depth. Pest control professionals can also spray your property frequently to help control the mosquito population.

 

Have a happy and mosquito free Fourth of July!

 

How to Get Rid of Mosquitoes Before BBQ Season

Exterme_Close-Up_Mosquito_Sucking_Blood

BBQ season is just around the corner, if not in full swing for some families. With hot dogs, potato salad, corn on the cob, and watermelon on the table, it is no wonder that mosquitoes want to be a part of the party. Let your guests enjoy their meal pest free and rid your yard of mosquitoes with these easy techniques that will prove to be a lifesaver. There are many things to briefly eliminate mosquitos such as bug spray and zappers but in order to reduce mosquitos for the entire season, you will probably want to take more drastic measures.

Reduce Their Breeding Ground

Many mosquitos on skin

Reduce the amount of mosquitoes that attend your summer Barbeques by getting rid of their breeding grounds—stagnant water! After heavy rainfall, backyard accessories such as bird baths can fill up with water, attracting the perfect breeding ground for mosquitos. Once you notice water building up in your backyard accessories, empty them immediately in order to alleviate the problem. If your home has a pond, there are solutions you can mix in with the water which will help reduce mosquito breeding that can be found at home improvement centers.

Citronella

Citronella Candle

Citronella candles are coming back in a big way. Not only are they sold in cute designer inspired containers but they also don’t smell terribly. In fact, a lot of the citronella aroma is covered up by other scents such as vanilla, berry, or coconut. However, don’t let the smell fool you because it will still keep the mosquitos away.

Lemongrass

Lemon grass in the garden

Lemongrass is a natural mosquito repellent and can be disguised in your garden by other plants. The citronella oil in the plant will keep mosquitoes out of your garden and away from your BBQ. Lemongrass requires a large amount of sunshine and can be planted virtually anywhere in your yard.

Rosemary

Rosemary

Rosemary’s double duties prove to be tasty in BBQ recipes and can be used as a form of bug repellent. Much like lemongrass, rosemary is a great natural mosquito repellent that can be planted in large pots and placed close to where guests sit.

Michael David is a freelance journalist and blogger living in New York City. Michael has a large amount of experience that spans from working for Long Island exterminator to freelance writing.

5 For Friday: This Week’s Link Round-Up

5 For Friday: This Week’s Link Round-Up

 

Pest Control Links Round-Up
Pest Control Links Round-Up

One Bald Face You Don’t Want at Your BBQ

Bald Face Hornets are notorious for ruining summer barbeques, and such was the case at a neighborhood Memorial Day BBQ recently in Columbus, OH. Read all about it, and what can be done to prevent/remove these hornets and their paper nests. More..

Debunking Home Pest Control Myths

Here are three common pest control misconceptions, debunked by a pest control professional. More…

What Works & What Doesn’t When It Comes To Mosquito Pest Control

Mosquito season is in full swing, and all of us are clamoring for the best mosquito control methods and products as to not contract the deadly West Nile Virus. What works? What doesn’t? More…

When Ants Come Marching In

Ants first send out scouts, looking for discarded food, soda, etc around your home. Once found, the rest of the colony will invade. They are very persistent pests, and will keep coming to your home or yard as long as there is a reason too. More…

Bionic Rats?

Did you know rats have pretty remarkable senses which make them almost seem bionic?! Check out these remarkable rodent traits. More…

 

Pest Of the Week: Cryptotermes Drywood Termites

 

Drywood Termite Droppings
Drywood Termite Droppings

Drywood termites are often times referred to as furniture termites because they frequently gorge on wood or timber furniture. After doing so, it is common for homeowners to see small piles of termite droppings (fecal matter). The wood that these termites attack has to have less than 12 percent moisture content. In this perfect Drywood termite environment, huge numbers of termites chew across the wood grain, constructing elaborate tunnels, and chambers in which they live.

Colonies of Drywood Termites are fewer in numbers then other species of termites, with one colony reaching about 1000 strong. Since colonies are fewer in number, it is common to see multiple colonies in one large piece of dry timber.

Cryptotermes Drywood Termites are common throughout all of the Southern United States, but are most prevalent in dry desert areas of the Southwest. Drywood termite infestations need to be addressed with professional termite control, as they can be very damaging to a home or property.

5 For Friday: Link Round-Up

Pest Of The Week: The Brown Recluse Spider

 

English: Adult male brown recluse spider dorsa...
English: Adult male brown recluse spider dorsal view. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Brown Recluse spider is also known as a Violin spider because of the violin markings found on it’s back. Because of its extremely venomous and deadly bite, the Brown Recluse is one of worst spider pests. These bites are extremely dangerous. There have been reports of lost appendages and even death because of these painful bites. Spider control efforts must be taken to keep these spiders out of your basements, attics, and garages.

While the Brown recluse is dangerous, it’s a rather shy spider that will only bite when it feels threatened. Bites occur when a hand is placed unknowingly on a spider while moving boxes for instance; or when a spider is inadvertently trapped against a person’s body while getting dressed or crawling in bed.

The Brown Recluse spider is tan in color. Adult spiders are about the size of a U.S. Quarter. The spider has a violin marking on its back, long legs, and is covered with short hairs. They are common in the lower Midwest and the Southeast U.S. They are nighttime hunters that do not use webs to catch insects.

 

5 Pest Control Links For Your Friday

 

Cluster Flies are a Real Pest to Deal With

Have you ever been enjoying the outdoors, when suddenly you’ve been swarmed by a hoard of tiny flies? More often than not, those are cluster flies and they can be more than a simple annoyance for some homeowners. More…

Buying Property? Approach With Eyes Wide Open

If you are in the market to buy a home, make sure pests haven’t moved in first. Here’s what you need to know. More…

Introducing the Rugose Spiraling Whitefly

Spiraling whiteflies are a landscaping nightmare. The pesky flies chew their way though trees and plants, leaving them yellow and wilted. For a free download about this relatively new pest, click here.

Bulwark Exterminating & Earth Day

Monday was Earth Day! Bulwark Exterminating has made efforts go green by going paperless. More…

Take Back Your Yard With Mosquito Control

With the warmer summer months almost upon us, mosquitoes will be out in full force. While they can be annoying, they can also be dangerous. Take back your backyard with these mosquito tips. More…

 

Mosquitoes That Drink Blood By The Gallon: Meet The Gallinipper

Gallinipper

If a regular mosquito was a smart car, than the gallinipper would be a Mack truck.

It’s the goliath of all mosquitoes. A biting bug that is so terrifying that it has emptied entire schoolyards of screaming children.

They are called gallinippers because it is believed they can nip a gallon of your blood. The worst part is that they are expected to invade South Florida in big numbers this mosquito season.

What Is A Gallinipper? 

We are headed to rainy season, and we all know that that means mosquitoes; and the largest blood sucking mosquito in the U.S. is the ‘Shaggy-Legged’ Gallinipper. The gallinipper, properly known as Psorophora ciliata, is easy to identify by its large size and the zebra-like pattern it has on it’s hairy legs.

Gallinippers favor cool shady areas with lots of standing water. These mosquitoes will lay their eggs in the soil, where they can remain dormant for several years before a heavy rain finally releases them. Adult gallinippers can fly upwards of two miles in search of a blood meal. Only female gallinippers bite, feeding on human or animal blood. They are also known to go after pets, wild animals and even fish. The voracious pests feed day and night–unlike everyday mosquitoes, which generally feed only at dawn and dusk.

The Gallinipper’s Bite 

The most notorious characteristic of the gallinipper is it’s extremely painful bite. When it bites you, you know it! One bite victim likens a bite to that of a tiny drill; another victim referred to a gallinipper bite as a stabbing knife. The gallinipper’s bite is strong enough to bite through clothing. Since the mosquito is so big, you’ll likely feel the gallinipper land on you before it is able to pierce your skin with it’s massive proboscis.

The mosquito got it’s name because of the amount of blood it can drink at any one time–gallinipper because it can nip a gallon of blood. The truth is gallinippers drink nowhere near a gallon of blood at one time. A victim would have to be attacked multiple times, by a huge swarm of gallinippers, before you would lose a gallon of blood.

Gillinipper’s Size

How Big Is The Gallinipper? 

The gallinipper is twenty times bigger then the average mosquito; about the size of a quarter.

Palm Beach County Mosquito Control expert Gary Goode says “it really lets you know when it lands on you… It practically breaks your arm. It’s almost impossible for the gallinipper to sneak up on you.

Gallinippers Invading Florida 

Every summer, depending on the rainfall, the Sunshine state braces for the swarms of mosquitoes that plague the state… including the gallinipper. The mosquito’s eggs that were laid last year could produce a bumper crop of the blood-sucking bugs this summer if Florida sees a soggy rainy season.

When the live gallinippers swarm, the phones start ringing off the hook at Palm Beach County Mosquito Control.

The gallinipper is found in the western most; flood prone, parts of Palm Beach County during the rainy season.

The Bad News About The Gallinipper 

• Are huge and intimidating—20x larger than regular mosquito

• Feed on human and animal blood

• Painful bites

• Frequently emerge after rain—which Florida gets a lot of

• Mosquito repellent does little to ward off the gallinipper, mostly because you’d have to use an entire can of DEET bases repellent before the massive mosquito would ever notice it.

The Good News About The Gallinipper 

• Don’t occur in great numbers in Central or South Florida

• Because of it’s size, it’s almost impossible for the gallinipper to sneak up on you

• Are not known to spread diseases like West Nile Virus

• Lifespan is only about a week

• Eat the larvae of their smaller mosquito cousins

• Continually sprayed by Florida mosquito control professionals to reduce numbers

The Truth About The Gallinipper 

The reports by the local media have made it sound like swarms of gallinippers are attacking Florida residents, drinking gallons of blood, slaughtering people by the thousands. These reports sound like something out of a made for TV movie on the Syfy Channel.

Gallinippers do exist. They have painful bites. Florida residents might see one or two this rainy season. Like all other mosquitoes, they do require a consistent pest control strategy to control their populations.

The real truth is that gallinippers will not break your arm when they land on you, and they won’t drink a gallon of your blood. The term “gallinipper” isn’t recognized by most entomologists, but over the past century, the word — and the insect — entered popular legend through Southern folktales, minstrel shows and blues songs, according to a report from the University of Florida.

 

Links Roundup: Pest Control News For The Week

Links Roundup: Pest Control News For The Week

 

Weekly Links RoundupInsects That Look Worse Than They Are

Bugs like the praying mantis, dragonfly, spider, and scarab beetle all look menacing. These insects’ bark is worse then their bite. They are actually quite beneficial. More…

Beware The Bug: Fire Ants – The Dangerous Home Invader

Fire ants pose a serious health risk, particularly to small children or family pets. They are known to have a strong, painful and persistent sting that often leaves a pustule on the skin. Left untreated, fire ant bites can become infected and in a few extreme cases, have been reported fatal. More…

Pest Control Tip: Beware Of Mites!

The microscopic mite can be found almost anywhere, just not outdoors. The house dust mite is the most common, but there are several other types of mites that can cause itchiness and skin irritation. More…

Pest Control: Mosquitoes

With the warmer weather just around the corner, the West Nile carrying mosquito will be making it’s dreaded appearance  Here are some tips for dealing with the annoying pests. More…

Pest Control Tip: De-Grub Your Lawn

It is estimated that grubs cause more than $234 million in property damages every year. Grubs are the offspring of Japanese beetles. Before they set up shop in your trees, they lay their eggs underground. The white c-shaped larvae hatch and immediately begin feeding upon the root system of your turf. More…

 

Pest Of The Week: The Wolf Spider

 

Burrowing wolf spider defending its egg sac.
Burrowing wolf spider defending its egg sac. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One of the more common spider pests in the United States is the wolf spider. These spiders garnered their nickname not because of their large, hairy, wolf like appearance, but because they were once thought to hunt in packs like wolves. Wolf spiders are excellent hunters. They do not build webs, but patiently wait in underground burrows for an unsuspecting cricket or cockroach.

Wolf spiders are brown in color, and can reach lengths of well over an inch. Their appearance is well known because of the Union Jack (British flag) impression on their backs. Although intimidating in appearance, wolf spiders don’t usually bite unless they are in danger or provoked. Wolf spiders are venomous.

Homeowners will frequently see these wolf spiders in their homes during the cooler months of the year. They enter homes looking for other insects to eat, and refuge from the elements. Even though the wolf spider’s venom is not lethal, their bites can cause health concerns. Traditional spider control methods are need for wolf spider elimination.