3 Sweet Bug Treats You Must Try

Those who know me best know I have a bit of a sweet tooth, so it would come to no surprise if I told you I was browsing indulgent recipes last night to satisfy my cravings. Upon doing so I came across this bug treat… This bug inspired snack:

http://www.bulwarkpestcontrol.com/bug-treats

While this particular lovebug treat only looks like a delicious bug, it got me wondering,

“Are there any sweet treats that actually have bugs in them?”

In my search, I found that there are actually a lot of tasty treats out there that have insects as a main ingredient. These three seemed to look the most appetizing.

Here are three sweet bug treats you must try:

Chocolate Chirpie Cookies

"Chocolate chirp cookies" with crickets

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup dry-roasted crickets
  • 1 12-ounce bag chocolate chips
  • >1 cup chopped nuts
  • 2 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. vanilla

Preparation & Cooking

Preheat oven to 375. In small bowl, combine flour, baking soda and salt; set aside. In large bowl, combine butter, sugar, brown sugar and vanilla; beat until creamy. Beat in eggs. Gradually add flour mixture and insects, mix well. Stir in chocolate chips. Drop by rounded measuring teaspoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 8-10 minutes.

Banana Worm Bread

 Banana Worm Bread

Ingredients

  • Dried mealworms1/4 cup dry-roasted meal worms
  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 mashed bananas
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped nuts
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1 teaspoon soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Preparation & Cooking

Mix together all ingredients. Bake in greased loaf pan at 350 degrees for about 1 hour.

Recipe courtesy of Iowa State University Entomology Department 

Cranberry Oatmeal Grasshopper Cookies

Grasshopper Cookie

Ingredients

  • 1 cup rinsed cranberries
  • 1 Cup White Chocolate Chips (Optional)
  • 1 ¾ cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 ¼ sticks unsalted butter, softened
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ½ cup packed light brown sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ cup dry roasted grasshoppers

Preparation & Cooking

Preheat oven to 325°F. Lightly grease baking sheets. In a bowl, stir together oats, flour, baking soda, and salt; set aside. In a separate bowl, beat together butter, granulated sugar, and brown sugar with an electric mixer until light and airy. Add egg and vanilla and beat well. Add oat mixture, crickets and cranberries and mix until well combined. Place dough in spoonfuls, 2 inches apart onto baking sheets. Bake cookies in upper and lower thirds of oven, switching position of sheets halfway. Bake until golden, about 12 minutes total.
Transfer to racks to cool. Makes 30 to 40 cookies.

Recipe courtesy of insectsarefood.com.

Bon Appetite!

The next time you’re craving something a little sweet, indulge your adventurous side by making up a batch of one of these bug treats. Let me know what you think, and comment below if you have any other insect recipes you’d like to share with our readers.

 

Ten Insect Dishes You Must Try

Spicy herb fried insect wings in food dish and blue fork.

Entomophagists are people who include bugs in their diet. While consuming insects is not for the faint of heart, there are some interesting recipes out there from various cultures which regularly incorporate bugs in their diet. Below is a list of ten unique insect dishes that you might want to try if you’re ever feeling adventurous or are simply looking for an additional source of protein.

1. BBQ Silkworm Chrysalises 

 

Fried silk worms

These hard shelled pupa are a byproduct of the silk industry and are canned or sold by street vendors throughout Asia. They can be enjoyed deep-fried or barbecued. This Asian delicacy can be eaten whole or you can just enjoy the yellow meat inside, which smells like raw meat and tastes like tofu.

2. Mosquito Eggs and Tortillas

 

Culex quinquefasciatus Ovipositing 

This Mexican delicacy involves drying and then roasting mosquito eggs prior to being served on a tortilla with a squeeze of lemon or lime. A small bottle of mosquito eggs is comparable to caviar at $50 a pop.

3. Katydid Texas & Thai Fusion 

 

notorious bug eating of asia

This dish combines Texas katydids with coconut oil, green onions, and Thai seasonings, with the concoction stuffed into mushroom caps to complete the exotic meal. Many people recommend removing the katydids’ legs, as they can be tough.

4. Cockroach Sushi 

 

Eggs, (cooked) bacon and hashbrown potatoes, s... 

Cockroaches can be clean and completely edible as long as they’re fed fruit and veggies before being toasted. These common household pests can be toasted, sautéed, or boiled, but must not be eaten raw. One dish you can incorporate cockroaches into is sushi – these critters go great with rice. It is said that large, hissing cockroaches taste like and have a similar texture to greasy chicken.

5. Centipede or Millipede on a Stick 

 

Centipedes on a stick

This snack is commonly sold by street vendors in China. While centipedes taste better, millipedes are more commonly used. Centipedes have to have their heads removed before cooking, since they use their pincers to bite, but the millipedes can be cooked with their heads intact. Millipedes on a stick are known to have a bland flavor, similar to a dry spaghetti noodle.

6. Waterbug Noodle Soup

 

Mang Da Na -- Giant Waterbugs
Mang Da Na — Giant Waterbugs (Photo credit: oschene) 

Waterbugs and udon noodle soup is a popular dish in Taiwan, taking precedence over the traditional chicken noodle soup we enjoy in the U.S. Apparently waterbugs taste like a mixture of clams and potatoes. Who knew?

7. Chocolate Cricket Chip Cookies

 

"Chocolate chirp cookies" with crickets
“Chocolate chirp cookies” with crickets (Photo credit: Mills Baker)

This unique spin on chocolate chip cookies adds in crickets for a nutty flavor and crunchy texture. Crickets are enjoyed by people all over the world, and are known to have a roasted nut flavor, which makes them the perfect addition to chocolate chip cookies.

8. Fried Hornworms

 

fried worms

Tomato and tobacco worms, also known as hornworms, have the distinct flavor of shrimp, crab, and green tomatoes when fried in oil. Although they must be put on a starvation diet for a few days prior to being eaten, since the plants they live off of are toxic for people to eat.

9. Tofu Grasshopper

 

Grasshopper special

Grasshoppers are a delicacy popular in Japan, Uganda, and Mexico, and are especially tasty when paired with tofu. Not all grasshoppers are edible, however – only solid colored ones can be eaten.

10. Chocolate Covered Scorpions

 

Chocolate-covered Scorpion 

It’s hard to resist any treat that’s been dipped in chocolate – even scorpions. The toxins from these pests are rendered harmless once the creatures have been stir-fried or just plain fried in hot oil. It is said that scorpions taste like shrimp, and are extra tasty when dipped in chocolate.

It takes someone with a lot of courage to try these dishes, but if you have an adventurous spirit you may just discover that you love them!

About the author: Chris is a blogger for a el paso pest control company. He hasn’t tried eating insects yet, other than the occasional fly from a too-wide yawn, but he’d really like to try. Especially chocolate covered ones.

Published by Thomas Ballantyne

Top 10 Edible Bugs

Most people agree that insects are unappetizing, but did you know that some people actually enjoy munching on them? It’s true- people who consume insects are practicing entomophagy, which is actually more common that you would think. Many insects are actually a good (and cheap) source of protein, and while most people eat bugs out of necessity, nowadays they are also considered a delicacy.

Below you will find a list of the top 10 edible insects, based on taste and popularity.

10. Weaver Ants Eggs 

 

Ant eggs for salad - Market outside Chiang Mai

Weaver ants eggs are used as a tasty dip or topping for salad and tortilla chips in Thailand. However, they can only be collected one month out of the year, which is a very tedious and painful process. Weaver ants’ eggs are squishy and must be fully cooked before being enjoyed.

9. Giant Water Beetles 

 

Fried Giant Water Beetles

Also a popular delicacy in Thailand are Giant Water Beetles. These huge beetles are deshelled and then roasted or fried. Supposedly they taste like scallops.

8. Larvets Worm Snacks 

 

Larvets Worm Snax

These worms are baked so they have a crunchy texture. They come in a variety of flavors such as BBQ, cheese and Mexican spice.

7. Witchetty Grubs 

 

Witchetty Grub

These large, fleshy, white wood eating moths or beetle larvae are a principal source of protein in the Australian Aboriginal diets. They can either be eaten raw or lightly baked (typically over fire coals.)

6. Crickets 

 

Fried Crickets

Crickets (along with grasshoppers) are a pretty common bug to be eaten. The general consensus seems to be that they have a nutty flavor, although you can buy them seasoned (such as Crick-ettes brand Cricket snacks, which come in three flavors: Salt and Vinegar, Bacon and Cheese, and Sour Cream and Onion.) In the Northeast area of Thailand, egg-laden crickets (in other words, “pregnant” crickets) are considered a popular and tasty snack.

5. Oven Baked Tarantula 

 

Oven Baked

Despite the fact that tarantula’s are arachnids, not insects, they are being included on this list simply because they are so closely related and commonly confused as being part of the insect family. At any rate, oven roasted tarantula is a popular menu item in Cambodia. The fangs must be removed before consuming; simply warm and enjoy. (Or not.)

4. Casu Marzu 

 

Casu Marzu, a type of cheese. This image was m...

Casu Marzu is a type of cheese made from sheep’s milk that is crawling with insect larvae, which is popular in Sardinia, Italy. The soft cheese has been fermented to the point of decomposition, inviting insect larvae to develop. Some people choose to pick off the translucent little worms crawling on the cheese surface, while others enjoy the maggots.

3. Termites

 

Deep Fried Bugs

Eating termites is a way of life in Africa and some parts of Indonesia. They’re commonly collected at the beginning of the rainy season (when other protein sources are scarce.) Termites taste best after being slightly roasted.

2. Chocolate Covered Giant Ants 

 

Chocolate Covered Insects

Ants are another commonly consumed insect, although they taste best encased in decadent Belgian chocolate. Giant Queen Leafcutter ants bathed in chocolate are said to have a nutty flavor, boost the immune system and give the consumer extra energy.

1. Bug Suckers

 

Bug Suckers

We’ve all (probably) seen the suckers housing insects at one time or another. These are a common treat sold across America in shopping malls and candy stores. Examples of insects which you can find encased in hard candy include scorpions (ok, these are arachnids,) worms, grasshoppers and crickets.

While eating insects is pretty much a novelty in our culture, in some places throughout the world it is a necessity. Just about any insect can be eaten, as long as it’s given a good, long boiling first. Although calling an exterminator is still recommended when you discover an outbreak of bugs in your house- technically you “go green” and eat them.

 

About the author: Chris is writer for a New Jersey pest control company.

 

Published By Thomas Ballantyne

Top 3 Biggest Insect Swarms In Recent History

There are more insects on Earth than there are human beings. Billions more. In fact, there are so many insects that they can sometimes swarm in the millions and devastate the landscape. Swarms are large numbers of insects that get together for a collective purpose. This purpose can be migration, mating, or eating. Swarming is a behavior that occurs more often than most people realize. Sometimes these swarms get so massive that they are positively biblical, as in the swarm of locusts that destroyed ancient Egypt’s crops. Here are a few massive swarms that have appeared in recent memory.

1931 Grasshoppers in the Midwest

Grasshopper Swarm
Grasshopper Swarm

Grasshoppers are famous for swarming and devouring miles of crop along the way. This usually happens as part of the mating drive, when certain conditions cause their wings and jaws to grow making them into hungry eating machines. They fly farther, and eat more as a result. The 1931 Swarm landed in the heartland of South Dakota, Nebraska, and Iowa in July. There are so many grasshoppers that they blocked out the sun and ate crops right down to the ground. People had to use shovels to scoop dead grasshoppers off the ground. This swarm was particularly bad because it occurred in the midst of the Great Depression and the Dustbowl, placing even more hardship on a strained nation.

2009 Ladybugs on Green Mountain

Ladybug Swarm
Ladybug Swarm

In Boulder, Colorado the residents experienced a very buggy summer of 2009 when millions of ladybugs landed to feast on a bumper crop of aphids. This swarm of bugs is mainly carnivorous, so the plants weren’t in too much danger, but the very wet spring provided plenty of green plants for the growth of other insects including aphids, slugs, snails, mosquitoes, and ants. The ladybugs were everywhere as they feasted on these insects. People reported seeing so many ladybugs on tree trunks that it appeared as if the bark itself were moving.

Double Cicada Hatching of 1998

Cicada Swarm
Cicada Swarm

Cicadas are large, winged bugs with massive eyes and no mouth parts. They live underground in a larval stage for a decade of their lives before emerging to develop wings as adults. These adults fly, mate, and die. They are not at all dangerous, but they are scary looking and sounding. Massive broods of cicada live under the North American continent, but they only come out once every 13 or 17 years. This is bad enough on its own when millions of bugs line the tree trunks and sidewalks, making chirping noises all night. However, once every 221 years, the brood hatchings will align and both 13 and 17 year cicadas crawl up out of the ground. This happened in 1998 and cicadas swarmed the northern and southern states of America in the millions. Luckily, this won’t happen again for another two hundred years.

Insect swarms are no joke. They can be quite annoying and cause lots of damage. However, not all swarms are locusts and grasshoppers. Some swarms are from normally harmless insects that in large numbers cause a lot of problems.

About the author: Chris is a blogger for a Union Exterminator company.

Published by Thomas Ballantyne

Are Insects Paleo?

Beijing Snack....Scorpions on a stick
Scorpions on a stick (Photo credit: ming1967)

How do you know if somebody is doing CrossFit?

They will be sure to tell you all about it!

The CrossFit community is a passionate group to say the least. With all seriousness, you can definitely tell if somebody is avid about CrossFit, and has been doing it for awhile… Their muscles will be bulging out of their shirt.

With this growing nationwide Crossfit trend, many CrossFit enthusiasts are practicing the accompanying Paleo diet.

As a bug guy, this Paleo lifestyle struck my curiosity… “Are insects Paleo?”

What Is Paleo?

You’ve heard it called the caveman diet. Others call it the ancestral, primal, real-food, or nutrient-dense diet. Whatever you call it, the Paleo way of eating mimics the eating habits of our ancient ancestors.

Paleo (short for Paleolithic) is about eating the foods that were prevalent during the Paleolithic era. Sorry, jelly-filled powdered donuts where not available back then. Needless to say, eating Paleo is very challenging for most. In terms of weight loss, and changing your body shape; results can be amazing.

Paleo foods include lean meats, seafood, grass-fed beef, veggies, roots, berries, various nuts, and eggs. Pasteurized dairy products, grains, legumes, and refined foods are strictly off limits. So where do insects fit in on the spectrum?

eating scorpions
Eating Scorpions (Photo credit: istolethetv)

Are Insects Paleo?

While the thought of eating bugs is repulsive to some; insects are a healthy, protein packed, meat alternative food option.

So is this healthy meat alternative Paleo? Short answer… Yes.

According to Paleo traditionalists, anything with a face is Paleo; and that includes insects. With this definition, apparently cannibalism is also Paleo.

A Paleo diet is less about avoiding grains, legumes, pasteurized dairy and refined foods; and is more about eating nutrient rich foods that work well with your body. Insects like crickets, scorpions, grubs, and grasshoppers are packed with protein and are actually very healthy when prepared correctly.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization, some insects contain twice the protein of raw meat and fish, while others, particularly in their larval stage, are also rich in fat, vitamins and minerals. Now that’s Paleo!

Paleo Flow Chart

CrossFit Flow Chart

 

Insects food stall in Bangkok, Thailand

Entomophagy- The Practice Of Eating Insects

Eating insects might seem like a gross act, better left for ‘Bizarre Foods’ host Andrew Zimmern. The truth is Entomophagy, or the act of eating insects, is a way of life for millions of people worldwide. People in less developed countries rely on insects for protein and other nutrients needed for survival. Scientists have long been touting insects as a protein-packed meat alternative that could help meet the world’s growing food demand.

While the practice of eating insects, may be unsettling for some people’s palates, different species of beetles, ants, bees, grasshoppers and crickets are eaten in 23 countries in the Americas, 29 countries across Asia, and 36 countries in Africa. In Thailand alone, 200 different insect species are consumed and are commonly sold as street snacks throughout the country.

Learn more about different country’s insect cuisine by clicking here.

Top 10 Bands Named After Pests

I recently had a lot of fun putting together a Spotify playlist of popular bug songs. While putting it together, I found several bands that also shared their names with pests. Here is my top ten bands named after bugs or pests:

10. Katydids

The Katydids reached stardom briefly in the early 90’s before guitarist Adam Seymour left the bad to play with The Pretenders. Before splitting, The Katydids released two moderately successful albums entitled Katydids (1991) and Shangri-la (1991).

Katydids 

Katydids, also known as long-horned grasshoppers, are best known for their appearance that mimics that of a leaf.

9. Adam and the Ants

Adam and the Ants, led by singer Adam Ant, became notable as a British cult band during the late-1970s punk rock era. Adam and the Ants have had a major influence on artists like Nine Inch Nails and Fat Boy Slim during the band’s short career.

The lineup for Adam and the Ants in 1981.
The lineup for Adam and the Ants in 1981. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ants are one of the most successful groups of insects, and a common pest. They are social insects that live in underground colonies, but many enter buildings looking for food.

8. Iron Butterfly

Iron Butterfly
Cover of Iron Butterfly

Iron Butterfly rose to fame in the late 1960’s. They were even booked to play at Woodstock, but were unable to after getting stranded at the airport. Their album, In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida is one of the world’s 40 top-selling albums, selling more than 30 million copies.

While Butterflies are generally not considered pests, some species can damage domestic crops or trees in their larval stages. Traditionally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts across many different cultures.

7. Papa Roach

Papa Roach has sold more than 18 million album copies worldwide, and are best known for their songs “Last Resort”, and “…To Be Loved.” Their music is best described as rap metal. Their first album, Infest, reached triple platinum in 2000.

Time and Time Again
Time and Time Again (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Roaches are one of the most common and hardy household pests in the United States. They invade our homes looking for their favorite foods like sugary sweets, salty snacks, and even hair or fingernails.

6. Alien Ant Farm

Alien Ant Farm got their name from a dream guitarist Terry Corso had about aliens cultivating the human race, like we were all in an ant farm. The band has had four successful albums, and has contributed to several Hollywood movie soundtracks; including 2002’s Spiderman. Their most popular song is “Smooth Criminal.”

Alien Ant Farm
Alien Ant Farm (Photo credit: woohoo_megoo)

The United States hosts almost 1,000 different species of ants. While they are considered one of the most common household pests, only 25 species commonly infest homes.

5. Ratt

One of the biggest bands in the early 80’s glam metal scene was Ratt. Their songs “Round and Round,” “Lay It Down,” and “Wanted Man” helped to launch the band into superstardom.

Lay It Down (Ratt song)
Lay It Down (Ratt song) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rats are very common household pests during the colder winter months. If you are seeing droppings, fresh gnawing, or tracks near your property; chances are you might have a serious rat infestation.

4. Buddy Holly and The Crickets

Even though Buddy Holly and The Crickets’ success was short lived because of an unfortunate plane crash, they may be one of the single most influential creative forces in early rock and roll. “That’ll be the Day” is the group’s most popular recording; and in 2011 Buddy Holly was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

01 - Buddy Holly & The Crickets
01 – Buddy Holly & The Crickets (Photo credit: Bradford Timeline)

Crickets are best known for their characteristic chirping noise, used by males to attract female crickets. As the temperatures rises, their songs become louder and faster.

3. Scorpions

Just by listening to “Rock You Like a Hurricane” before any football game, one comes to the realization that Scorpions are one of the greatest hard rock bands of all time. In case you need any more proof, the band has sold over 150 million records, released 23 albums over the last 40 years, and played around 5,000 concerts in over 80 countries.

Ralph Rieckermann of Scorpions.
Ralph Rieckermann of Scorpions. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Much like the band, scorpions have been around a long time and are incredibly resilient. They require a focused pest control strategy. A testament to their durability was proven when lab experiments froze scorpions for weeks, leaving them unharmed when they were thawed. On top of that, after U.S. nuclear testing scorpions were discovered near ground zero with no adverse side effects.

2. Bee Gees

The Bee Gees, made up of brothers Robin, Maurice, and Barry Gibb were one of the biggest recording artists during the late 60’s to early 70’s. During the group’s 45 years of stardom, only Elvis Presley, The Beatles, Michael Jackson, Garth Brooks and Paul McCartney have outsold them.

Publicity photo of the Bee Gees.
Publicity photo of the Bee Gees. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While bees are considered beneficial insects by pollinating plants, they earn the title of pest by stinging and contributing to several deaths a year; common when a sting victim has a severe allergic reaction.

1. The Beatles

The Beatles are the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed act in the history of popular music. John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr have sold 177 million albums in the US, more than any other artist.

I'm Happy Just to Dance with You
I’m Happy Just to Dance with You (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Beetles constitute almost 25 percent of all known life-forms; more than any other order in the animal kingdom. There are some species of Beetle that have been awarded the distinction of pest. A few include: the Colorado potato beetle, the boll weevil and the Carpet beetle. They repeatedly create insect control problems when they invade and destroy household items and agricultural crops.

I hope you enjoyed my list. Did I miss any?

 

 

Pests Your Thanksgiving Turkey Might Eat

Thanksgiving Turkey

The turkey has been a staple of Thanksgiving since the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Natives ate it for their first Thanksgiving in 1621. Thanksgiving is colloquially called “Turkey Day” since turkey is the most common main dish of the holiday.

This year alone, American turkey growers have raised 270 million turkeys; which will correspond to the five billion pounds of turkey Americans will eat this Thanksgiving. That’s a lot of turkey!

While Americans love eating their turkey for Thanksgiving, turkeys equally love eating all sorts of bugs. Turkey’s raised on farms traditionally eat corn and seeds, but wild turkeys love eating insects and other creepy crawlies in order to get much needed protein. Some may even consider enlisting a turkey for scorpion control. (Have it your way, bugs or bird poop. Or call a professional.)

But really, as a bug guy, the whole turkey dinner thing got me thinking:

What would a turkey’s dinner look like on Thanksgiving?

 

Appetizer

A rustic arrangement of escargot featuring the Leopard Snail

Salad Course

A lovely Flowering Dogwood salad tossed with North American Millipedes

Main Entrée

A large assortment of raw Grasshoppers, Field Crickets, and Black Carpenter Ants, served with a side of Wolf Spiders, and generously garnished with Dandelion.

Dessert

A delectable Earthworm Mud Pie sprinkled with Chiggers.

 

For Bulwark’s complete list of what turkeys eat, click here.

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

With Thanksgiving fast approaching, and the holiday season is in full swing, Bulwark Pest Control would like to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving! No matter what your plans are or where you’ll be, there are many things to be thankful for. Take some time this week and reflect on all of your many blessings. Watch a lot of football, enjoy the company of your loved ones, and eat way too much pie. Have a Happy Turkey Day!

Grasshoppers for Dinner in San Jose – Ryan Jones Eats Bugs

I was recently in San Jose, speaking a bit on the finer points of Local Pest Control Companies online. Well, sadly I was informed of a little San Jose Restaurant serving up a plate of bugs a little too late for me to partake. Lucky for me one of my SMX conference friends, Ryan Jones, did sample the Grasshopper Dinner and lived to tell about it:

Ryan Jones Show Us How to Eat Grasshoppers!

The other day I ended up at MezCal Mexican restaurant a few blocks from SMX with 3 lovely ladies from 352 Media (@erinever, @kellikimpton, and @jdallis) and some random British guy we found on the street. After a few sol’s and margaritas, the table decided that we had to order up a dish that consisted of grasshoppers, chips, and guacamole. As you can see from the picture, it was pretty obvious that they didn’t do much to them other than cook them.

Grasshoppers in the bowl

How do Grasshoppers Taste?

The grasshopper taste was very odd. They smelled like sardines and were very salty and crunchy – with almost a prune style aftertaste. I’m not sure if it was the sauce or the actual grasshopper itself. By the way, when I say crunchy, I mean very crunchy – and you can definitely feel the legs in your throat when you swallow.

Definitely an experience, or as Bear Grylls says “a good bit of protein!”

– Thanks Ryan. You can find Ryan on twitter @RyanJones

Perhaps Bulwark can supplement their pest control business by offering up gourmet bugs after they are removed from people’s homes? KIDDING. Bulwark Exterminaitng won’t be serving grasshoppers or any other bug entrees anytime soon. 

 

 

 Would you eat a grasshopper?

Eat a San Jose Grasshoper
Would you eat this?
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