Pest Control: Your Friday Links Round-Up

Black House SpiderPest Control: Your Friday Links Round-Up

Fall Wasp Wars

Every autumn, homeowners wage war against wasps and hornets. These flying pests grow excessively aggressive as their preferences move from proteins to sweets. Learn more about these wasp wars.

How to Get Rid of Bugs in Acorns and Pine Cones

Many of us use pine cones for holiday decorations every year, but unknowingly bring pests into our homes by doing so. Here’s a step by step guide to getting rid of these unwanted bugs so you may continue using acorns and pine cones for decor. More…

Plants Enlist Aid From Birds For Pest Control

When trees or plants are under attack from insects, they can emit certain scents that attract birds. The birds in turn then gobble up many of the plants-munching bugs. More…

Tips to Pest Proofing Your Home This Fall

With the change of season comes a different challenge for homeowners because it is also a peak time for pests to make their way indoors. Learn to protect yourself, here.

When Are Carpenter Ants Active?

Click here, to learn more about the most active times of year for carpenter ants.

Carpenter BeePest Of The Week: Carpenter Bees

Measuring almost an inch in length, Carpenter bees get their name for their love of all things wood. They will build their nests in building frames, dried wood, tree stumps, and bamboo by chewing through it. They can be destructive pests, despite their ability to beneficially pollinate.

These bees look almost like bumble bees, but are a little bit smaller and have a glossy, hairless, black abdomen. Throughout the spring and summer months, female Carpenter bees gather nectar to transform into their “bee bread” which they feed to the rest of the colony.

There’s more good news (other than beneficial pollination) about Carpenter bees… The males that one usually sees buzzing around the hive cannot sting.

Friday Links Round-Up: Weekly Pest Control Articles

fall leavesFriday Links Round-Up: Weekly Pest Control Articles

 

What is a Vole?

Often confused for mice, voles can be equally as troublesome. Lean more about voles, here.

Facts About Bed bugs Appearance, Bites and Behavior

What do bed bugs look like? What do their bites look like? What should you do if you have bedbugs? Get the bedbug facts here.

Where Did All Of These Stink Bugs Come From?

It’s that time of year again. The cooler fall months mean that stink bugs will be swarming near your home, perhaps in record numbers. See how these pests have spread across the United States, and learn what you can do about them, here.

Do Ultrasonic Bat Repelling Devices Really Drive Bats Away?

Check out the stats on bat repelling devices, here.

Bed Bugs Shut Down University of Arizona Main Library

Bed bugs hit yet another library. This time, the target was that of the University of Arizona. More…

 

German RoachPest Of The Week: The German Cockroach

Of all the species of cockroach found in the United States, the German cockroach just might be the most common. These roaches measure a little smaller than other cockroach species; about ½ inch in length. They are sometimes confused for Asian cockroaches, because of their similar appearance and presence of wings; but unlike their cockroach cousin, German roaches very rarely fly.

These dark brown colored German roaches enter our homes because they are not very tolerant of the weather. They are also always on the lookout for sources of food, including: sweets, starches, proteins, glue, soap, trash, and even toothpaste. Look for German cockroaches in your kitchens and bathrooms, as they like moisture as well. They will quickly dart away if you turn on the lights, as these roaches prefer the cloak of darkness.

Professional roach control treatments are needed to exterminate serious German cockroach infestations.

Friday Links Round-Up: Your Weekly Pest Control Articles

Sideview of black widow spiderFriday Links Round-Up: Your Weekly Pest Control Articles

 

Rodents Don’t Like Cold Weather Either

Now that summer is on the way out and winter is fast approaching, it is once again time to fortify your home against the coming invasion of mice, rodents, and bats. More…

The American Cockroach: What You Need To Know

Those who have the misfortune of dealing with roaches are left with more questions than answers. What do American cockroaches look like? What do they eat? Why are they attracted to my home? How can I get rid of them and prevent them from returning? Get answers to those questions and more, by clicking here.

4 Easy Ways To Know If You’ve Been Bitten By Bed Bugs

Uh, Oh! You wake up in the morning with a handful of red marks across your abdomen. How do you know if these are bedbug bites? More…

Fall Spider Barrier Treatments

For various reasons, a variety of spiders begin turning up in homes and offices in increasing numbers during the fall. For the most part, it’s the same reason that you go inside: to stay out of the cold. Learn more about how to stop this behavior, so you can enjoy your home, by clicking here.

Landscaping Tip: Garter Snake Pest Control

Garter snakes are the most commonly found garden snake that homeowners and landscapers encounter. What can you do about them? More…

 

Africanized Honeybee ScoutPest Of The Week: Africanized “Killer” Bees

What most people refer to as “killer bees,” are technically called Africanized Honeybees. These aggressive bees are hybrids of the African honeybee and the European honeybee, and were unintentionally bred through scientific research at the University of São Paulo in the late 1950’s. Then the worst happened… a few got loose in the Brazilian tropics, and have been migrating north ever since.

One of the scariest features of the Africanized “killer” bee is their aggressive behavior. Additionally, you cannot visually tell the difference between the killer bee and the common European honey bee. They look the same, and spend their time pollinating flowers, crops, and producing honey. In fact, the only way to tell the difference between these bees, other than their aggressive swarming behavior, is through molecular analysis.

The Africanized honeybee is extremely hostile. This behavior is what gives these bees their infamous “killer” reputation. Unlike standard honeybees, Africanized killer bees are effortlessly agitated and aggressive when disturbed. They will chase everything they estimate to be hazardous to their colony, and can continue to be agitated for up to 24 hours. This behavior leads to many Africanized killer bee attacks every year in the United States; some of which have even lead to death in both humans and animals.