Largest Spider Fossil Ever Found Is 165 Million Years Old

Scientists have uncovered the oldest spider fossil on earth, dating back 165 million years.  The specimen measures about two square inches and was unearthed near the Daohugou village in northeastern China.

The new discovery, dating back to the Middle Jurassic period, has been dubbed Nephila jurassica.  Until now, the oldest Nephila spider only dated back 34 million years.  While this newly discovered species is considered extinct, descendants include the golden orb-weaver spiders.  Golden Orb-weavers are known for spinning elaborate, gold-colored webs strong enough to trap bats and small birds.

This new discovery is also leading scientists to reconsider the former geographic location and conditions of northeastern China.  Modern golden orb spiders are typically found in more warmer, tropical climates.  This now leads researchers to believe that the northeastern region of China may have been apart of Pangaea, the super-continent that existed prehistorically that was believed to contain all seven modern-day continents.  The region that now includes the Daohugou village is suspected to have been in the warm and humid regions of Pangaea.

While prehistoric science may not be Bulwark Exterminating’s strength, we can safely conclude that spiders have been man’s pest control problem for millions and millions of years.  We here at Bulwark also conclude that spiders will continue to be man’s pest control problem for millions of years to come.

If you enjoyed this article, Get email updates (It’s Free)


View all posts by

2 thoughts on “Largest Spider Fossil Ever Found Is 165 Million Years Old

  1. That looks like a camel spider that many soldiers in Iraq have taken photos with yet far more aggressive looking. Awesome specimen I wonder how powerful the venom was!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *